British education System history

History of Education in Britain

Education and educational system in Britain have long and interesting history. There were lots of changes during the progress.

We'll give you a few information about some main situations of educational system in Britain starting with the 12th century.

12th -14th centuries

Schools were attached to monasteries and churches to educate clerics who were the civil cervants and the scholars of the time as well as monks, nuns and priests.Education had no direct control by the state, the church had been almost a monopoly of literacy and education.Existed chantry schools for boys from poor families, beating was highly recommended in chantry schools and was an importany part of school and home education; song schools attached to cathedrals and almonry schools attached to monasteries for sons of those connected with the religious house to which they were attached or for relatives of monks.After song and almonry schools young men knew alphabet, were able to sing religious songs, to read Latin prayers and to read in English.Different from chantry schools in the song & almonry schools beating was not recomended, those who broke the rules felt the rod without delay and if anyone knew Latin but spoke English or French with companions or with the clerk, had a 'blow from the rod' for every word. Then in Britain of those days existed preparatory and grammar fee-paying schools for sons of merchants. In preparatory schools were taught reading and writing in Latin and English sufficient for entering a grammar school, and in grammar school itself were taught Latin and Divinity. After leaving grammar school a young man knew Latin Grammar, was able to translate from English into Latin, could sing in Latin and compose 24 verses a day, in grammar schools young men took part in debates conducted in Latin.The in Britain also existed home education for future monarcs, sons of noblemen. Men were taught military arts and court etiquette so the school-leavers had some military skills and skills in courty accomplishments. Then during the 12th and 13th centuries were some private foundations: by the bishop of Winchester the Winchester college was founded(1383)nowadays included to Clarenda Nine( nine most privilleged and oldest universities in Britain), during 12th-13th centuries were also founded Oxford and Cambridge Universities.

15th-16th centuries

Henry the Eights disbands the monasteries, were founded 'public schools' Eton, Winchester & others. Existed infant or 'petty' schools for sons of merchants, skilled craftsmen and squires.Boys were taught reading, writing and saying catechism or a series of questions and answers about God and Church.The aim of such schools was to teach a boy to be able to read and write in English. In infant schools was a belief that children are sinful when they are born and in order to make them grow up into good Christians, parents and teachers should be very strict with them and it goes without saying in that beating was thought to be the best way of making children learn. So if some pupil made a mistake at the lesson he was beaten. Then existed grammar and public schools for sons of tradesmen and craftsmen. But then children were taught not only Latin & Divinity, but Greek, Arithmetic and Music so that the pupils were able to speak and write in Latin, to write poems and essays in Latin, they knew some passages from the Bible by heart. For boys from the poor families existed parish schools , where boys were taught Reading, Writing and a bit of Latin and were able to say the Lord's Prayer. Also still existed home education for future monarchs, sons of nobility under the supervision of a knight. Education aimed at teaching: the military arts, court etiquette and social graces, reading and writing in Latin, sports. Then education for girls arose. But actually it was considered more important for a girl to know about housewifery than Latin. And so the girls did not attend school, but they were often taught in well-to-do families how to read, write and do sums. In 1509 in London was founded St.Paul's school, in 1552 Shrewbury school was founded, in 1560- Westminster school, in 1561-The Merchant Taylors' public school for boys in London, in 1567-Rugby school in Yorkshire, in 1572- Harrow school in Middlesex. All of them are included into the list of Clarenda Nine.

Interesting facts:

In the United Kingdom, an independent school (also referred to as a private school, and in certain cases a public school) is a school which is funded by private sources, predominantly in the form of tuition charges, gifts and long-term charitable endowments, and is...

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